Global climate report underlines urgency of reducing emissions

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Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

If anyone had any doubt before whether we need to do all we can as fast as we can to reduce global warming pollution, the latest major scientific report should set them straight.

On Aug. 9, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its latest findings on the science of global warming. The report confirms that our society is on track to do irrevocable damage to the planet in the coming decades -- unless we immediately and dramatically reduce fossil fuel emissions. To do that, PIRG is working to electrify America's transportation system, end federal subsidies for the fossil fuel industry, curb waste pollution, and more.

"We’re already seeing the impacts of global warming, and they’re already taking a human toll -- from the deadly winter storm that hit Texas in early 2021, to the record-breaking heatwave in the Northwest in June that killed 500 people in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Canada," said Matt Casale, PIRG’s environment campaigns director.

"But the solutions to climate change are at our fingertips. By taking concrete action to end our reliance on fossil fuels, we can build a better future for our kids and grandkids with cleaner air, cleaner water and healthier communities."

Read more.

Learn more about our campaigns to preserve a livable climate for future generations.

Photo: Matt Casale speaks on the need to curb transportation emissions by electrifying more of our transportation at a 2019 press conference. Credit: Athel Rogers Photography

Aaron Colonnese
Content Creator

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Content Creator

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.