Blog Posts By:

Ed Mierzwinski,
Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program

Last week U.S. district court judge Colleen McMahon disrupted a bankruptcy judge’s approval of a Sackler plan to hide most of the family’s billions as part of the corporate bankruptcy of opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma, a firm controlled by the family. We support the draft Sackler Act, which would expressly prohibit such a scheme by non-debtors.

Cover graphic above by Mike Licht via Flickr; Some rights reserved.

The CFPB has asked BigTech giants including Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, PayPal, and Square to answer questions about their payment system practices. The CFPB has also asked consumers, small businesses and others for comments (including complaints), which are due on December 6. Learn more.

Graphic from the Internet Archive Wayback Machine's first crawl of the new CFPB's new website, February 8, 2011.

Exploding airbag that sends shrapnel into passengers? Pickup truck that catches fire for no reason? These are just a few of the safety recalls that could endanger you or your family if unrepaired. Under federal law, you can’t buy a new car with an unrepaired or “open” safety recall, but thanks to FTC consent orders with GM and some mega-car dealers, you can buy a used car with open safety recalls. So we sued the FTC in 2017. We're still in court. Learn more.

Photo credit: Shutterstock photo by Anastasiya Aleksandrenko. 

Today, the Task Force on Financial Technology of the House Financial Services Committee holds a hearing titled “Buy Now, Pay More Later? Investigating Risks and Benefits of BNPL and Other Emerging Fintech Cash Flow Products.” Learn more.

Image of hand and smartphone "Sezzle" courtesy The Focal Project via Flickr, some rights reserved.

In testimony this morning before the House and tomorrow morning before the Senate, newly-confirmed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) director Rohit Chopra will lay out his vision for the federal financial agency with just one job, protecting consumers.

The House should pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill on the House floor this week. Among other provisions, it allocates $65 billion to make fast broadband more available -- especially in rural and tribal areas -- and more affordable. That total includes about $14 billion to subsidize access and about $42 billion to deploy broadband. Also, broadband providers would be required to use a new pricing label based on the easy-to-read FDA nutrition labels.

Photo of "Rural Broadband Buildout Project" by Maryland GovPics, via Flickr, some rights reserved.

Half the country faces fire and wind, the other half wind, rain and flood. Despite nay-saying from some members of Congress, the Biden administration's financial regulators continue to make the global climate change crisis a financial regulatory priority. 

Cover graphic by Ron Mader via Flickr, some rights reserved.

President Biden's recent Executive Order on promoting competition in the economy includes several specific recommendations on improving competition in the financial sector. It proposes that the CFPB give consumers more choices by giving them control of their financial data. It proposes that regulators strengthen oversight of bank mergers, which for years have been routinely rubber-stamped. While it doesn't specifically address the payment system oligopoly that raises the prices everyone pays, lowering swipe fees is also a logical outcome of the EO.

Cover photo of the Marriner Eccles Federal Reserve Building, Washington, DC by Rafael Saldaña via Flickr, Some Rights Reserved.

Today, the U.S. House takes a key vote. HR2668, the Consumer Protection and Recovery Act, would restore the FTC's Section 13(b) authority to hold wrongdoers accountable and compensate consumer-victims harmed by their actions. The Supreme Court had recently ruled that the power, used for over 40 years to recover billions, was not clearly articulated in law.

Cover photo via Flickr by Mr. Blue MauMau, some rights reserved.

Next week, the full House of  Representatives is expected to vote on HR2668, critical legislation to restore Federal Trade Commission authority to disgorge ill-gotten gains from corporate wrongdoers to use to compensate victims of the crime. This spring, the Supreme Court had held that the power was not clearly defined in law, even though courts had upheld the authority for many years, allowing the FTC to return billions of dollars  to consumers.

-- Cover graphic of FTC Building via Flickr, by Boston Public Library, Some rights reserved.