Transportation

Report | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Highway Boondoggles

Even though the Driving Boom is now over, state and federal governments continue to pour vast sums of money into the construction of new highways and expansion of old ones – at the expense of urgent needs such as road and bridge repairs, improvements in public transportation and other transportation priorities. Eleven proposed highway projects across the country – slated to cost at least $13 billion – exemplify the need for a fresh approach to transportation spending.

21st Century Transportation

Getting Georgia's state transportation priorities on track.

Report | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Higher Ed, Transportation

A New Course

Across America, colleges and universities are showing that efforts aimed at reducing driving deliver powerful benefits for students, staff and surrounding communities. Policymakers at all levels of government should be looking to the innovative examples of these campuses. Universities and college towns also provide useful models for expanding the range of transportation options available to Americans while addressing the transportation challenges facing our communities.

Resource | Transportation

A New Direction In Driving Trends

After a 60 year boom, driving is on the decline in the U.S. and no likely scenario shows it returning to previous levels of growth. 

Report | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Direction

The Driving Boom—a six decade-long period of steady increases in per-capita driving in the United States—is over. The time has come for America to hit the “reset” button on transportation policy—replacing the policy infrastructure of the Driving Boom years with a more efficient, flexible and nimble system that is better able to meet the transportation  needs of the 21st century. 

News Release | Georgia PIRG | Transportation

Transportation Bill is a Step Backwards

Statement by Phineas Baxandall, Georgia PIRG’s Senior Transportation Analyst, regarding the disappointing federal Transportation Bill as released from conference committee today.

News Release | Georgia PIRG | Transportation

House Proposal Threatens to Defund Public Transportation

Statement of Georgia PIRG Program Associate, Jessica Wilson on the House Ways and Means Committee title (H.R. 3864) of the surface transportation bill to fund all federal investment in transportation over the next five year.

Report | Georgia PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Caution: Red Light Cameras Ahead

Privatized traffic law enforcement systems are spreading rapidly across the United States. As many as 700 local jurisdictions have entered into deals with for-profit companies to install camera systems at intersections and along roadways to encourage drivers to obey traffic signals and follow speed limits.

The public interest is threatened when private camera companies and municipalities focus on ticket revenues first and safety second.  Before signing a camera enforcement contract with a vendor, local governments should heed the advice of the Federal Highway Administration and first investigate traffic engineering solutions for problem intersections or roadways. If officials decide that private enforcement systems are appropriate, they should still avoid deals that will limit future decisions about protecting safety.

Pitfalls of Contracting for Traffic Cameras:

  • -Contracts between private camera vendors and cities can include payment incentives that put profit above traffic safety.  Privatized traffic enforcement system contracts that limit government discretion to set and enforce traffic regulations put the public at risk, including the duration of yellow lights, ticket quotas, and enforcement on right turns.
  • -Contracts between camera vendors and cities can include penalties for early   termination – or fail to provide provisions for early termination – leaving taxpayers on the hook even if the camera program fails to meet its objectives. 

 The privatized traffic law enforcement industry has amassed significant political clout that it uses to shape traffic safety nationwide.  Camera vendors lobby aggressively to expand the use of private traffic law enforcement to more states and communities.

 

To prevent these problems, local government officials who are considering privatized traffic law enforcement should follow ten recommendations outlined in the report to protect the public by ensuring that cameras are not considered as a potential source of revenue but only as a public safety measure.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Transportation

Support Us

Your donation supports Georgia PIRG’s work to stand up for consumers on the issues that matter, especially when powerful interests are blocking progress.

Consumer Alerts

Join our network and stay up to date on our campaigns, get important consumer updates and take action on critical issues.
Optional Member Code